What Does A Bulged Disc Feel Like?

If you have a herniated lumbar disc, you may feel pain that radiates from your low back area, down one or both legs, and sometimes into your feet (called sciatica).

You may feel a pain like an electric shock that is severe whether you stand, walk, or sit.

Can a bulging disc heal on its own?

Usually a herniated disc will heal on its own over time. Be patient, and keep following your treatment plan. If your symptoms don’t get better in a few months, you may want to talk to your doctor about surgery.

What are the symptoms of a bulging disc in your lower back?

Symptoms

  • Arm or leg pain. If your herniated disk is in your lower back, you’ll typically feel the most pain in your buttocks, thigh and calf.
  • Numbness or tingling. People who have a herniated disk often have radiating numbness or tingling in the body part served by the affected nerves.
  • Weakness.

What happens if a bulging disc goes untreated?

Severe slipped disc cases can lead to permanent nerve damage or cut off certain nerve impulses. You may experience sharp or intense pains, irregular bowel movements, incontinence, or even partial paralysis. Untreated herniated discs can cause unpleasant and painful symptoms.

How is a bulging disc diagnosed?

In most cases of herniated disk, a physical exam and a medical history are all that’s needed for a diagnosis.

Imaging tests

  1. X-rays. Plain X-rays don’t detect herniated disks, but they can rule out other causes of back pain, such as an infection, tumor, spinal alignment issues or a broken bone.
  2. CT scan.
  3. MRI.
  4. Myelogram.
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Can a chiropractor fix a bulging disc?

Chiropractic Care and Back Pain: Non-Invasive Treatment for Bulging, Ruptured, or Herniated Discs (Slipped Discs) Chiropractic care is a non-surgical treatment option for herniated discs. A chiropractor review the results of a spinal x-ray with his patient whose back pain may be caused by a bulging or herniated disc.

What is the difference between a bulging disc and a herniated disc?

Herniated disks are also called ruptured disks or slipped disks, although the whole disk does not rupture or slip. Only the small area of the crack is affected. Compared with a bulging disk, a herniated disk is more likely to cause pain because it generally protrudes farther and is more likely to irritate nerve roots.

Is walking good for a bulging disc?

You don’t need to endure an intense cardio program or lift heavy weights—simple stretching and aerobic exercises can effectively control your herniated disc pain. Moderate aerobic activities, including walking, biking, and swimming, also help relieve pain.

How long will I be off work with a bulging disc?

Most bulging disc injuries do take several weeks to settle. They will also remain weak and vulnerable for at least six weeks, sometimes longer.

Will a massage help a bulging disc?

Deep Tissue Massage: There are more than 100 types of massage, but deep tissue massage is an ideal option if you have a herniated disc because it uses a great deal of pressure to relieve deep muscle tension and spasms, which develop to prevent muscle motion at the affected area.

Can you fix a bulging disc without surgery?

Most (80-90%) patients with a new or recent acute disc herniation will improve without surgery. The doctor will usually try using nonsurgical treatments for the first few weeks. If the pain still keeps you from your normal lifestyle after completing treatment, your doctor might recommend surgery.

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How do you fix a bulging disc in your lower back?

Nonsurgical treatment may include:

  • Rest. One to 2 days of bed rest will usually help relieve back and leg pain.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs). Medications such as ibuprofen or naproxen can help relieve pain.
  • Physical therapy.
  • Epidural steroid injection.

What should I avoid with a bulging disc?

Everyday Activities to Avoid With Herniated Disc

  1. Sitting too much. Sitting puts more stress on your spinal discs, especially when slouching forward in a seat.
  2. Doing laundry.
  3. Vacuuming.
  4. Feeding a pet.
  5. Strenuous exercise.
  6. Shoveling snow or gardening.
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