What Does Chemo Feel Like?

Chemotherapy can cause fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, bowel issues such as constipation or diarrhoea, hair loss, mouth sores, skin and nail problems.

You may have trouble concentrating or remembering things.

There can also be nerve and muscle effects and hearing changes.

How many days after chemo do you feel better?

Acute nausea and vomiting usually happens a few minutes to hours after chemo is given. It goes away within the first 24 hours. The worst of this acute vomiting most often happens about 5 or 6 hours after chemo. Delayed nausea and vomiting starts more than 24 hours after chemo and up to 5 to 7 days after treatment.

Is chemotherapy painful?

Some chemotherapy drugs can cause painful side effects, such as aching in the muscles and joints, headaches and stomach pains. Pain may be felt as burning, numbness, tingling or shooting pains in the hands and feet (called peripheral nerve damage).

Do the side effects of chemo get worse with each treatment?

Q: Do chemo side effects get worse with each treatment? A: Some people undergoing chemotherapy report that they feel more fatigue the further along they get in their regimen. Nerve damage can occur with chemotherapy, and this may get worse with each dose. Sometimes, treatment has to be stopped because of this.

How do you feel after first chemo treatment?

The day after your first treatment you may feel tired or very fatigued. Plan on resting, as this gives your body the chance to respond to the chemotherapy, and begin the recovery cycle. Remember that chemo affects every cell in your body. Stay well-hydrated by drinking lots of water or juice.

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What is chemo belly?

Bloating can also be caused by slowed movement of food through the G.I. (gastrointestinal tract or digestive tract) tract due to gastric surgery, chemotherapy (also called chemo belly), radiation therapy or medications.

Do you ever fully recover from chemotherapy?

It is your last chemotherapy infusion or radiation treatment. The rule of thumb I usually tell my patients is that it takes about two months of recovery time for every one month of treatment before energy will return to a baseline. Everyone is different but at least this gives you a ballpark.

Can you drive while having chemotherapy?

Have a friend or family member drive you to your first treatment. Most people can drive themselves to and from chemotherapy sessions. But the first time you may find that the medications make you sleepy or cause other side effects that make driving difficult.

Can you eat ice cream during chemo?

Eat high calorie foods: milkshakes, ice cream, sauces, Carnation Instant Breakfast, Ensure, and Boost. Stay away from fatty, fried, and greasy foods. Your appetite will come back in 2-6 weeks after your chemotherapy is over.

Does Chemo make you gain weight?

Chemotherapy may directly or indirectly cause weight gain or weight loss. Slight fluctuations (a few pounds) in your weight, after chemotherapy, either up or down, are not dangerous. However, significant chemotherapy weight loss or weight gain may affect your health and/or your ability to tolerate your treatments.

How do you know if chemo is working?

How do you know if chemotherapy is working to treat your cancer? Your oncologist will watch your body’s response during and after chemotherapy. She’ll use tests like physical exams, blood tests, or imaging scans like X-rays to determine if your tumor is shrinking or growing.

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How long can chemo prolong life?

The Median Duration of Response tells you how long your cancer can be expected to respond to the chemotherapy, before the cancer starts growing again. For most cancers where palliative chemotherapy is used, this number ranges from 3-12 months. The longer the response, the longer you can expect to live.

Is it harmful to take a break from chemotherapy?

Just because you and your oncologist agree you may need to delay or alter your chemotherapy or radiation schedule, it does not mean you need to take a break from all treatment. Symptom and pain management related to the cancer can still be treated, even if you are not actively receiving anti-cancer therapies.