What Does A Hot Flash Feel Like?

Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the face, neck and chest.

Your skin might redden, as if you’re blushing.

Hot flashes can also cause sweating, and if you lose too much body heat, you might feel chilled afterward.

What happens to your body when you have a hot flash?

It’s a sudden feeling of heat and sometimes a red, flushed face and sweating. Hot flashes start when blood vessels near the skin’s surface widen to cool off, making you break out in a sweat. Some women have a rapid heart rate or chills, too. When they happen while you sleep, they’re called night sweats.

What age do hot flashes start?

Fewer than one percent of women become menopausal at or before age 40. The average age for menopause is 51. Still, hot flashes can occur as early as 10 years before menopause.

How many hot flashes in a day is normal?

A single hot flash can last anywhere from one to five minutes and may occur a few times a week for some women or daily for others. When hot flashes are severe, they may strike four or five times an hour or 20 to 30 times a day, Omicioli says.

Can hot flashes be caused by something other than menopause?

While hypothyroidism is the usual culprit in these cases, non-menopausal hot flashes can also be due to thyroid cancer. Food and drink, including spicy foods, caffeine, and alcohol, can trigger hot flashes. Other conditions such as HIV and tuberculosis can produce symptoms similar to hot flashes and night sweats.