What Does A Jellyfish Sting Feel Like?

Common signs and symptoms of jellyfish stings include: Burning, prickling, stinging pain.

Red, brown or purplish tracks on the skin — a “print” of the tentacles’ contact with your skin.

Throbbing pain that radiates up a leg or an arm.

How painful is a jellyfish sting?

It’s the tentacles that sting. While jellyfish stings are painful, most are not emergencies. Expect pain, red marks, itching, numbness, or tingling with a typical sting. But stings from some types of jellyfish — such as the box jellyfish (also called sea wasp) — are very dangerous, and can even be deadly.

How long does a jellyfish sting last?

Jellyfish stings cause immediate, intense pain and burning that can last for several hours. Raised, red welts develop along the site of the sting, which may look like you have been hit with a whip. The welts may last for 1 to 2 weeks, and itchy skin rashes may appear 1 to 4 weeks after the sting.

What do you do if you get stung by a jellyfish?

What If You Get Stung By a Jellyfish?

  • Rinse the area with vinegar. (Not cool fresh water or seawater, which could make it worse.)
  • Avoid rubbing the area, which also can make things worse.
  • Use tweezers to pull off any tentacles still on your skin.
  • Do not put ice or ice packs on a sting.
  • Check with your doctor.

Are you supposed to pee on a jellyfish sting?

For starters, don’t pee on yourself or your friends if there’s a stinging incident. Urine does contain urea, which helps with tentacle removal, but your pee is too diluted for it to work. Plus, the salt in the urine might trigger more nematocysts to fire into the skin. Not good.