What Does An Aneurysm Feel Like In Your Head?

About brain aneurysms

Most brain aneurysms only cause noticeable symptoms if they burst (rupture).

Symptoms include: a sudden agonising headache – it’s been described as a “thunderclap headache”, similar to a sudden hit on the head, resulting in a blinding pain unlike anything experienced before.

a stiff neck.

Are there any warning signs of a brain aneurysm?

Warning Signs and Symptoms

While most brain aneurysms cause no symptoms, individuals with large brain aneurysms that have not yet ruptured may experience severe localized headaches, blurred vision, changes in speech and neck pain, depending on the size and location of the aneurysm. Sudden blurred or double vision.

How do you detect an aneurysm?

A brain aneurysm is usually diagnosed using an MRI scan and angiography (MRA), or a CT scan and angiography (CTA). An MRI scan is usually used to look for aneurysms in the brain that haven’t ruptured. This type of scan uses strong magnetic fields and radio waves to produce detailed images of your brain.

What causes an aneurysm?

Aneurysms have a variety of causes including high blood pressure and atherosclerosis, trauma, heredity, and abnormal blood flow at the junction where arteries come together. Mycotic aneurysms are caused by infections of the artery wall. Tumors and trauma can also cause aneurysms to form.

Does an aneurysm headache go away?

It’s not uncommon for people to confuse the symptoms of a ruptured brain aneurysm with those of a migraine. “Doctors call it a thunderclap headache, [and] it does not go away completely even with migraine medications,” she says, adding that some people may also experience neck pain.