What Does Spleen Pain Feel Like?

What are the symptoms of spleen problems?

An enlarged spleen may cause:

  • No symptoms in some cases.
  • Pain or fullness in the left upper abdomen that may spread to the left shoulder.
  • Feeling full without eating or after eating only a small amount from the enlarged spleen pressing on your stomach.
  • Anemia.
  • Fatigue.
  • Frequent infections.
  • Easy bleeding.

What causes spleen pain?

An enlarged spleen can be caused by infections, cirrhosis and other liver diseases, blood diseases characterized by abnormal blood cells, problems with the lymph system, or other conditions. Other causes of an enlarged spleen include: Inflammatory diseases such as sarcoidosis, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis.

How is an enlarged spleen treated?

Spleen removal surgery

If an enlarged spleen causes serious complications or the cause can’t be identified or treated, surgical removal of your spleen (splenectomy) may be an option. In chronic or critical cases, surgery may offer the best hope for recovery. Elective spleen removal requires careful consideration.

Can a spleen heal on its own?

In the past, treatment for a spleen injury always meant removal of the entire organ, called a splenectomy. However, doctors now say that some spleen injuries can heal on their own, particularly those that are not very severe. If a person with a suspected spleen rupture has low blood pressure or unstable vital signs.

Where do you feel spleen pain?

A common symptom of an enlarged spleen is a feeling of pain or discomfort in the upper left side of abdomen, where the spleen is located. You might also experience a feeling of fullness after only eating a small amount. This usually happens when the spleen becomes enlarged to the point that it presses on the stomach.

Where is spleen pain located?

Where is the pain located? Because of its location, should it enlarge, the spleen can irritate the diaphragm and cause hiccups and perhaps some pain in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen. Because its location adjacent to the diaphragm, pain from the spleen may radiate to the back and be felt in the shoulder blade.

How do you check your spleen?

An enlarged spleen is usually detected during a physical exam. Your doctor can often feel it by gently examining your left upper abdomen. However, in some people — especially those who are slender — a healthy, normal-sized spleen can sometimes be felt during an exam.

How do you know if your spleen is swollen?

Symptoms you may experience with an enlarged spleen include: pressure or pain in the left upper part of your abdomen (near the stomach), feeling full without eating a large meal, or pain your left shoulder blade or shoulder area when taking a deep breath.

Is an enlarged spleen serious?

Potential complications of an enlarged spleen are: Infection. An enlarged spleen can reduce the number of healthy red blood cells, platelets and white cells in your bloodstream, leading to more frequent infections. Anemia and increased bleeding also are possible.

What kind of doctor treats an enlarged spleen?

For example, hematologists (doctors who specialize in treating blood disorders), oncologists (cancer specialists), and gastroenterologists (liver and digestive tract specialists) all commonly take care of patients who may have enlarged spleen as a response to another condition.

Can I take ibuprofen with an enlarged spleen?

If we cannot stop the bleeding, we may need to remove the spleen. For 4 weeks, do not take aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve).

What foods to avoid if you have an enlarged spleen?

Frozen food, icy drinks, cucumber, bitter or winter melon, lettuce and grapefruit deplete the spleen’s “fire”. Foods that are “damp” – such as dairy products, refined sugars and sweets – can also smother the digestive process.