Readers ask: What Does Hiv Muscle Pain Feel Like?

The Link Between HIV and Joint Pain

Arthritis pain caused by HIV or medications can affect many joints, including your:. Improved HIV therapies make joint pain less likely. Let your doctor know if your joint pain: Comes and goes, or is constant. It’s important to make sure an infection other than HIV isn’t causing your joint pain.

What kind of muscle pain is associated with HIV?

Other muscle diseases may result from drug-induced effects of HIV drugs, primarily azidothymidine (AZT), or direct invasion of muscle tissue by HIV. An inflammation of a voluntary muscle (myositis), for example, may be the first symptom of HIV; other muscle diseases may result from drug-induced effects of HIV drugs, primarily azidothymidine (AZT), or direct invasion of muscle tissue by HIV.

Does HIV pain come go?

Many people living with HIV experience chronic or long-term pain; in one study of 238 HIV-positive people, 53% reported having chronic pain in the previous six months.

Can HIV cause pain all over the body?

Pain can affect many parts of the body and can occur at any stage of HIV disease. Pain usually occurs more frequently and becomes more severe as HIV disease progresses, but each person is different, so some people may have a lot of pain while others have little or none.

Does HIV cause back pain?

In patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus ( HIV ), low back pain is a common cause of chronic pain.

What disease causes joint and muscle pain?

Acute pain in multiple joints is most often caused by inflammation, gout, or the onset or flare-up of a chronic joint disorder. Chronic pain in multiple joints is usually caused by osteoarthritis, an inflammatory disorder (such as rheumatoid arthritis), or juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children.

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What is body aches a sign of?

Infections and viruses The flu, the common cold, and other viral or bacterial infections can cause body aches. When an infection occurs, the immune system sends out white blood cells to fight the infection, causing inflammation and making the muscles achy and stiff.

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